shame on us

My postings here were distracted by impressive events on the home front. We trusted, loved, gave without measure of ourselves and resources. We were building family: a strong nuclear, multi-generational family in an extraordinarily healthy community.

In our dream the kids, who had a bad habit of moving on every year or two, would find our world so perfect in every way that they would cherish, treasure, and work together with us to build a dream we all could share.

After all, they said so. Repeatedly.

The Woman and the Snake

An old woman was walking down the road when she saw a gang of thugs
beating a poisonous snake. She screamed at the thugs and rescued the
snake, taking it back to her home where she nursed it back to health.

One day on their way into town, the woman picked up the snake and he
bit her repeatedly. “Oh God,” she screamed, “I am dying. I am dying!”
She turned to the snake and looked it in the eyes. “I saved your life.
I was your friend. I trusted you. Why did you bite me?”

The snake turned to face her as she drew he final breath and hissed,

“What did you expect? You knew I was a snake when you took me home.”

Silly old people.

Their unexpected, inglorious, dishonorable exit was much like this:

We are feeling a bit more like the bridge was not just burned, it has been effectively nuked.

Of course that thought brings to my mind this photographic set of Detroit and Hiroshima.
People of substance build.
Hollow people consume.

The homestead is now in productive hands, guided by experience and wisdom. The three of us are industrious by nature. We thrive on making positive changes with our minds and hands.

As we begin working through the layers of planning and implementing changes to be made, there turns out to be more silver lining than black cloud.

Garden Club Cabin Tour 2017

The Friendly Gardener’s Club Toured our little piece of heaven this month. We had a lovely time. Alice was able to tell me that the “blueberries” ripe all along the road beyond us are Service berries. This is the first year in four that they have ripened. A few of us walked to the top of the knoll above our place and enjoyed the 360 degree view.

 

A friend made this planter for us.

Our Entry

What does one do with a bird bath that doesn’t hold water?

new white lilac

Ted builds many shelves for us; this is one of his latest.

Thanks to Carol McDonald for making everyone feel welcome.

We are on the East Fork of the Bitterroot River in Conner.

Thank you to all who came.

Thanks for bringing the cookies, Alice!

It was a gorgeous day!

Tiger Lillies in bloom.

Two-Tailed Swallowtail butterfly

Box from Lindy

Seven Gravenstein apples, 5 lemons, 3 potatoes, 2 zucchini, 2 lemon cucumbers (mom’s favorite!), 2 yellow crookneck squash, 2 pints of crab meat and one big jar of her apricot-pineapple jam. Wow!

The flowers are amazing! Wonderful that they will last a long time.

It made mom cry. She’s better now; she’s eating an apple. They may not make it into a pie; mom LOVES apples, too.

 

 

traveler

This guy has been visiting us lately … much to our visual and spiritual delight.

He is pretty shy, spotting me from over a dozen meters away, and flitting off. I had to zoom in with my magical Canon SX-710 from almost 20 meters to capture these photos.

We are all three so happy with how pretty our garden looks. It is wonderful to share it with this swallowtail, and for him to grace our garden with his beauty.

After reading a bit about their life cycle, I will be letting local milkweed and other beneficials grow a little more freely.

I was going to post interesting bits about the Monarch Butterfly, its amazing 4-stage, 4-generation annual life-cycle from Mexico and nearby SW USofA. However, closer inspection led me to conclude my recent, regular garden visitor is instead a Two-Tailed Swallowtail butterfly. Probably every bit as cool and interesting, but just a tad different.

 

Two-tailed Swallowtail (Papilio multicaudata)

This large yellow and black striped butterfly is truly a gift from nature. It has two tails and beautiful blue markings scaling across the hind wings. This butterfly is lovely and graceful, yet it is so rarely enjoyed up close and personal. In 2001, the Two-tailed Swallowtail made its way into history; it officially became the State Butterfly of Arizona. If you live in the western part of the United States, this butterfly would be a wonderful addition to any garden.

Family: Swallowtail (Papilionidae)

Subfamily: Swallowtail (Papilioninae)

Average Wingspan: 3 1/2″ – 5″

Habitat: Foothill slopes and canyons, moist valleys

Similar To: Eastern Tiger Swallowtail , Western Tiger Swallowtail

Plants That Attract This Butterfly

* May not be available for purchase at your local nursery.

Note: Always check a plant’s Hardiness Zone to make sure it will grow in your area. (What Is My Hardiness Zone?)

Where To Buy Plants

Butterfly Flight Range Map

Two-tailed Swallowtail Flight Range Map