driver training

Mackenzie has been bugging for driver training, or more accurately opportunities to drive – heck with the training.

Missy started lessons today.

ALERT: It is worse than hot out there

Many of us have noticed that the sun seems intense this summer. A friend who works outdoors says he actually feels the sun abnormally burning, boring-into his skin.

Another friend called yesterday reporting that their sophisticated photographic hobby drone refused to fly. It reported that:

the electromagnetic field was too intense for the drone’s controls to operate.

That took him to the Internet for investigation. Which, in turn, set him contacting friends to warn them about this intensity spike in solar energy reaching us.

The Environmental Protection Agency publishes maps quantifying the intensity of sun rays striking our Earth.

Reportedly, some places in Arizona and New Mexico are currently in a streak of unprecedented ratings of 14!

The two maps to the right show good reason for limiting sun exposure through the middle of the day. It is obviously worse the more directly the sun is overhead.
 

 


Get your outdoor work done in the morning or evening
… and/or wear protection.

 

While there is a part of one federal agency warning us to stay out of the sun, we have other governmental agencies who are furiously modifying our weather with chemtrails and HAARP.

The freak storms, heat, flooding and other never-before weather events are completely unrelated… or they claim those would be much worse without their interventions … or they are not doing any of that – it us just conspiracy theory … TRUST US.

While the two maps are a little disconcerting, reading below what the scales mean is a serious wake-up call.

Meanwhile, we have little choice but to deal with the symptoms as best we can. Wear broad-brimmed hats, long sleeves and long pants if you must spend time in the mid-day sun.

BY THE WAY, I have not trusted chemical sunscreen since … I can’t remember when. Opting, instead, for the strategies employed by generations of equatorial desert dwellers … light-weight, light-colored clothes covering most of my body. Now it turns out that the sharp uptick in melanomas may be proving that sunscreens cause more cancers than the sun itself.

BE VERY SUSPICIOUS.

Use your head.

Think for yourself.

 

UV Index Scale

The UV Index scale used in the United States conforms with international guidelines for UVI reporting established by the World Health OrganizationExit

Learn how to read the UV index Scale to help you avoid harmful exposure to UV radiation.

0 to 2: Low

UV Index Low - Green
A UV Index reading of 0 to 2 means low danger from the sun’s UV rays for the average person.
 
  • Wear sunglasses on bright days.
  • If you burn easily, cover up and use broad spectrum SPF 30+ sunscreen.
  • Watch out for bright surfaces, like sand, water and snow, which reflect UV and increase exposure.

3 to 5: Moderate

UV Index Moderate - Yellow

A UV Index reading of 3 to 5 means moderate risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure.

  • Stay in shade near midday when the sun is strongest.
  • If outdoors, wear protective clothing, a wide-brimmed hat, and UV-blocking sunglasses.
  • Generously apply broad spectrum SPF 30+ sunscreen every 2 hours, even on cloudy days, and after swimming or sweating. 
  • Watch out for bright surfaces, like sand, water and snow, which reflect UV and increase exposure.

6 to 7: High

UV Index High - Orange

A UV Index reading of 6 to 7 means high risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure. Protection against skin and eye damage is needed.

  • Reduce time in the sun between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
  • If outdoors, seek shade and wear protective clothing, a wide-brimmed hat, and UV-blocking sunglasses.
  • Generously apply broad spectrum SPF 30+ sunscreen every 2 hours, even on cloudy days, and after swimming or sweating. 
  • Watch out for bright surfaces, like sand, water and snow, which reflect UV and increase exposure.

8 to 10: Very High

UV Index Very High - Red

A UV Index reading of 8 to 10 means very high risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure. Take extra precautions because unprotected skin and eyes will be damaged and can burn quickly.

  • Minimize sun exposure between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
  • If outdoors, seek shade and wear protective clothing, a wide-brimmed hat, and UV-blocking sunglasses.
  • Generously apply broad spectrum SPF 30+ sunscreen every 2 hours, even on cloudy days, and after swimming or sweating. 
  • Watch out for bright surfaces, like sand, water and snow, which reflect UV and increase exposure.

11 or more: Extreme

UV Index Extreme - Purple

A UV Index reading of 11 or more means extreme risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure. Take all precautions because unprotected skin and eyes can burn in minutes. 

  • Try to avoid sun exposure between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
  • If outdoors, seek shade and wear protective clothing, a wide-brimmed hat, and UV-blocking sunglasses.
  • Generously apply broad spectrum SPF 30+ sunscreen every 2 hours, even on cloudy days, and after swimming or sweating.
  • Watch out for bright surfaces, like sand, water and snow, which reflect UV and increase exposure.

The Shadow Rule

 

An easy way to tell how much UV exposure you are getting is to look for your shadow:

  • If your shadow is taller than you are (in the early morning and late afternoon), your UV exposure is likely to be lower.
  • If your shadow is shorter than you are (around midday), you are being exposed to higher levels of UV radiation. Seek shade and protect your skin and eyes.

 

First Aid Kits

It’s time to get re-certified for CPR & First Aid. There is a class coming up in July that I plan on taking.

We have recently purchased the cadillac of first aid kits. IMO, of course. The first consideration, was for my husband, who had to handle an emergency at home alone with our beloved dog, Scooter. Having gone through it, and it was a bad experience, he has strong opinions on what is a GOOD first aid kit.

So, with no limits on expense, and having previous knowledge of this kit, we finally purchased it the AMP 3. It is the larger orange roll-up in the photo. This is where it can be purchased. https://www.amp-3.net $420 price tag but with a discount at checkout paid $360 and 7 lbs loaded.

Here is a list of contents. Unfortunately, it’s not too readable, but you get the idea, it’s a long list. ]

Amp 3-1st Aid Kit

And, there is a video, if you can score one, that explains every item in the kit.

The AMP 3 is comprehensive, expensive, and organized to the max.

Notice that when rolled out it has pockets containing “modules” to treat different emergencies. You can label the pockets, change things around and re-label the pockets, too. This saves a lot of time looking for what you need.

Unlike this kit, Lightening X, I found on Amazon, that is loaded with lots of stuff, but how does one organize it for efficient use? It is $300. see it here

We already have a variety of small kits in our vehicles. The one in my trunk is very old and I have added some things to it but it could still use some updating. For one thing, it is an old vinyl suitcase that has held up well over many years, but if you want to find something fast, not so good compared to what is available now.

The AMP 3 is stationed at our front entry along with a smaller kit I made for using around the house and property. It has a much smaller list of contents, of course, and was made with a toiletry bag that I purchased at a yard sale for fifty cents. These bags are often found in thrift stores, too. Nice thing about it is that it can be hung from a door knob, or any other sticky-outy you happen to find.

Contents of DIY kit: alcohol, peroxide, threaded needle (in a small bottle), tweezers, scissors, lavender & Vit E oils, roll of gauze, 2×2 & 3×3 pads, 3 rolls of tape, variety of smaller bandages, Sling, cotton swabs & pads, dropper, measuring spoon, colloidal silver spray & gel, benadryl tablets, throat lozenge, thermometer, disposable ace wrap, and a syringe.

I have yet to go over this list to add any obvious oversights. Moving on…

Here is a kit for $33 to $100, depending on which one you select, 3 lbs, that is also very well organized. see details here

and is quite compact:

Here is the roll-up style on a smaller scale: The 12 Survivors at 2 lbs https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BT6EZRI/?coliid=I3M844RN56K1FH&colid=CRDFO6PB92PY&psc=0&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it

One review on YouTube said that it was a good bag (hard to buy bags without the contents) but that you would have to add a lot to it to make it valuable. The contents are rather weak. So, perhaps the next one is the one I would recommend for those on a budget.

Possibly, for the money, saved the best for last: the Adventure for $50, 1.5 lbs, also well organized and compact. see details here

Here is a good checklist to work with when you inventory your first aid kit:
Medical kits lists