Instant Pot Cooking!!!

Instant Pot Spaghetti Recipe

Super easy and super fast classic spaghetti with meat sauce.

A great way to use your Instant Pot and clean up is a breeze! It may just become a family favorite!

 

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 25 minutes

Total Time: 30 minutes

Servings: 5

Ingredients

1 tsp olive oil

1 lb. 92% – 96% lean ground beef

2 cloves garlic, minced (2 tsp)

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

12 oz. dry spaghetti noodles*

3 sprigs fresh basil, plus more for serving

1 (24 oz.) jar four cheese marinara sauce, such as Classico

1 (14.5 oz.) can petite diced tomatoes

2 2/3 cups warm water

Shredded or grated parmesan cheese, for serving

Instructions

  1. Set instant pot to “saute”. Once it reads “hot” add 1 tsp olive oil then break beef into large chunks and add to instant pot along with garlic and a few pinches of salt.
  2. Let beef brown, stirring and breaking up beef occasionally, until cooked through, about 6 minutes. Press the “cancel” button to turn instant pot off. 
  3. Break spaghetti noodles in half. Add about 1/6 into an even layer over beef, then add another 1/6 going the opposite direction into an even layer. Repeat this pattern with remaining noodles four times (this doesn’t need to be perfect! It’s just to reduce sticking).  
  4. Add in marinara sauce, basil, tomatoes and water and season lightly with salt and pepper (don’t stir). 
  5. Seal the lid of the Instant Pot, making sure the valve is set to “sealing.” Press the “manual mode” button (or high pressure on other pressure cookers) and set to 7 minutes.
  6. Once time is up, use the quick release method according to manufactures instructions (basically just stand back and flick the valve). Once sputtering stops open lid, remove basil and toss spaghetti with a fork.   
  7. Let rest two minutes (this will allow some of that extra liquid to soak in and the noodles to cook through). Sere warm with parmesan and basil leaves or chopped basil ribbons. 

Instant Pot Spaghetti Recipe

deck railing salvation

A lot of work got her to this point. All the Verathane, inappropriate for this application, had to be removed. Lots of sanding was required to make up for the weathering in just one year. But here is Miss Perseverance laying on the third coat of stain.

driver training

Mackenzie has been bugging for driver training, or more accurately opportunities to drive – heck with the training.

Missy started lessons today.

ALERT: It is worse than hot out there

Many of us have noticed that the sun seems intense this summer. A friend who works outdoors says he actually feels the sun abnormally burning, boring-into his skin.

Another friend called yesterday reporting that their sophisticated photographic hobby drone refused to fly. It reported that:

the electromagnetic field was too intense for the drone’s controls to operate.

That took him to the Internet for investigation. Which, in turn, set him contacting friends to warn them about this intensity spike in solar energy reaching us.

The Environmental Protection Agency publishes maps quantifying the intensity of sun rays striking our Earth.

Reportedly, some places in Arizona and New Mexico are currently in a streak of unprecedented ratings of 14!

The two maps to the right show good reason for limiting sun exposure through the middle of the day. It is obviously worse the more directly the sun is overhead.
 

 


Get your outdoor work done in the morning or evening
… and/or wear protection.

 

While there is a part of one federal agency warning us to stay out of the sun, we have other governmental agencies who are furiously modifying our weather with chemtrails and HAARP.

The freak storms, heat, flooding and other never-before weather events are completely unrelated… or they claim those would be much worse without their interventions … or they are not doing any of that – it us just conspiracy theory … TRUST US.

While the two maps are a little disconcerting, reading below what the scales mean is a serious wake-up call.

Meanwhile, we have little choice but to deal with the symptoms as best we can. Wear broad-brimmed hats, long sleeves and long pants if you must spend time in the mid-day sun.

BY THE WAY, I have not trusted chemical sunscreen since … I can’t remember when. Opting, instead, for the strategies employed by generations of equatorial desert dwellers … light-weight, light-colored clothes covering most of my body. Now it turns out that the sharp uptick in melanomas may be proving that sunscreens cause more cancers than the sun itself.

BE VERY SUSPICIOUS.

Use your head.

Think for yourself.

 

UV Index Scale

The UV Index scale used in the United States conforms with international guidelines for UVI reporting established by the World Health OrganizationExit

Learn how to read the UV index Scale to help you avoid harmful exposure to UV radiation.

0 to 2: Low

UV Index Low - Green
A UV Index reading of 0 to 2 means low danger from the sun’s UV rays for the average person.
 
  • Wear sunglasses on bright days.
  • If you burn easily, cover up and use broad spectrum SPF 30+ sunscreen.
  • Watch out for bright surfaces, like sand, water and snow, which reflect UV and increase exposure.

3 to 5: Moderate

UV Index Moderate - Yellow

A UV Index reading of 3 to 5 means moderate risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure.

  • Stay in shade near midday when the sun is strongest.
  • If outdoors, wear protective clothing, a wide-brimmed hat, and UV-blocking sunglasses.
  • Generously apply broad spectrum SPF 30+ sunscreen every 2 hours, even on cloudy days, and after swimming or sweating. 
  • Watch out for bright surfaces, like sand, water and snow, which reflect UV and increase exposure.

6 to 7: High

UV Index High - Orange

A UV Index reading of 6 to 7 means high risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure. Protection against skin and eye damage is needed.

  • Reduce time in the sun between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
  • If outdoors, seek shade and wear protective clothing, a wide-brimmed hat, and UV-blocking sunglasses.
  • Generously apply broad spectrum SPF 30+ sunscreen every 2 hours, even on cloudy days, and after swimming or sweating. 
  • Watch out for bright surfaces, like sand, water and snow, which reflect UV and increase exposure.

8 to 10: Very High

UV Index Very High - Red

A UV Index reading of 8 to 10 means very high risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure. Take extra precautions because unprotected skin and eyes will be damaged and can burn quickly.

  • Minimize sun exposure between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
  • If outdoors, seek shade and wear protective clothing, a wide-brimmed hat, and UV-blocking sunglasses.
  • Generously apply broad spectrum SPF 30+ sunscreen every 2 hours, even on cloudy days, and after swimming or sweating. 
  • Watch out for bright surfaces, like sand, water and snow, which reflect UV and increase exposure.

11 or more: Extreme

UV Index Extreme - Purple

A UV Index reading of 11 or more means extreme risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure. Take all precautions because unprotected skin and eyes can burn in minutes. 

  • Try to avoid sun exposure between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
  • If outdoors, seek shade and wear protective clothing, a wide-brimmed hat, and UV-blocking sunglasses.
  • Generously apply broad spectrum SPF 30+ sunscreen every 2 hours, even on cloudy days, and after swimming or sweating.
  • Watch out for bright surfaces, like sand, water and snow, which reflect UV and increase exposure.

The Shadow Rule

 

An easy way to tell how much UV exposure you are getting is to look for your shadow:

  • If your shadow is taller than you are (in the early morning and late afternoon), your UV exposure is likely to be lower.
  • If your shadow is shorter than you are (around midday), you are being exposed to higher levels of UV radiation. Seek shade and protect your skin and eyes.