ALERT: It is worse than hot out there

Many of us have noticed that the sun seems intense this summer. A friend who works outdoors says he actually feels the sun abnormally burning, boring-into his skin.

Another friend called yesterday reporting that their sophisticated photographic hobby drone refused to fly. It reported that:

the electromagnetic field was too intense for the drone’s controls to operate.

That took him to the Internet for investigation. Which, in turn, set him contacting friends to warn them about this intensity spike in solar energy reaching us.

The Environmental Protection Agency publishes maps quantifying the intensity of sun rays striking our Earth.

Reportedly, some places in Arizona and New Mexico are currently in a streak of unprecedented ratings of 14!

The two maps to the right show good reason for limiting sun exposure through the middle of the day. It is obviously worse the more directly the sun is overhead.
 

 


Get your outdoor work done in the morning or evening
… and/or wear protection.

 

While there is a part of one federal agency warning us to stay out of the sun, we have other governmental agencies who are furiously modifying our weather with chemtrails and HAARP.

The freak storms, heat, flooding and other never-before weather events are completely unrelated… or they claim those would be much worse without their interventions … or they are not doing any of that – it us just conspiracy theory … TRUST US.

While the two maps are a little disconcerting, reading below what the scales mean is a serious wake-up call.

Meanwhile, we have little choice but to deal with the symptoms as best we can. Wear broad-brimmed hats, long sleeves and long pants if you must spend time in the mid-day sun.

BY THE WAY, I have not trusted chemical sunscreen since … I can’t remember when. Opting, instead, for the strategies employed by generations of equatorial desert dwellers … light-weight, light-colored clothes covering most of my body. Now it turns out that the sharp uptick in melanomas may be proving that sunscreens cause more cancers than the sun itself.

BE VERY SUSPICIOUS.

Use your head.

Think for yourself.

 

UV Index Scale

The UV Index scale used in the United States conforms with international guidelines for UVI reporting established by the World Health OrganizationExit

Learn how to read the UV index Scale to help you avoid harmful exposure to UV radiation.

0 to 2: Low

UV Index Low - Green
A UV Index reading of 0 to 2 means low danger from the sun’s UV rays for the average person.
 
  • Wear sunglasses on bright days.
  • If you burn easily, cover up and use broad spectrum SPF 30+ sunscreen.
  • Watch out for bright surfaces, like sand, water and snow, which reflect UV and increase exposure.

3 to 5: Moderate

UV Index Moderate - Yellow

A UV Index reading of 3 to 5 means moderate risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure.

  • Stay in shade near midday when the sun is strongest.
  • If outdoors, wear protective clothing, a wide-brimmed hat, and UV-blocking sunglasses.
  • Generously apply broad spectrum SPF 30+ sunscreen every 2 hours, even on cloudy days, and after swimming or sweating. 
  • Watch out for bright surfaces, like sand, water and snow, which reflect UV and increase exposure.

6 to 7: High

UV Index High - Orange

A UV Index reading of 6 to 7 means high risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure. Protection against skin and eye damage is needed.

  • Reduce time in the sun between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
  • If outdoors, seek shade and wear protective clothing, a wide-brimmed hat, and UV-blocking sunglasses.
  • Generously apply broad spectrum SPF 30+ sunscreen every 2 hours, even on cloudy days, and after swimming or sweating. 
  • Watch out for bright surfaces, like sand, water and snow, which reflect UV and increase exposure.

8 to 10: Very High

UV Index Very High - Red

A UV Index reading of 8 to 10 means very high risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure. Take extra precautions because unprotected skin and eyes will be damaged and can burn quickly.

  • Minimize sun exposure between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
  • If outdoors, seek shade and wear protective clothing, a wide-brimmed hat, and UV-blocking sunglasses.
  • Generously apply broad spectrum SPF 30+ sunscreen every 2 hours, even on cloudy days, and after swimming or sweating. 
  • Watch out for bright surfaces, like sand, water and snow, which reflect UV and increase exposure.

11 or more: Extreme

UV Index Extreme - Purple

A UV Index reading of 11 or more means extreme risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure. Take all precautions because unprotected skin and eyes can burn in minutes. 

  • Try to avoid sun exposure between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
  • If outdoors, seek shade and wear protective clothing, a wide-brimmed hat, and UV-blocking sunglasses.
  • Generously apply broad spectrum SPF 30+ sunscreen every 2 hours, even on cloudy days, and after swimming or sweating.
  • Watch out for bright surfaces, like sand, water and snow, which reflect UV and increase exposure.

The Shadow Rule

 

An easy way to tell how much UV exposure you are getting is to look for your shadow:

  • If your shadow is taller than you are (in the early morning and late afternoon), your UV exposure is likely to be lower.
  • If your shadow is shorter than you are (around midday), you are being exposed to higher levels of UV radiation. Seek shade and protect your skin and eyes.

 

traveler

This guy has been visiting us lately … much to our visual and spiritual delight.

He is pretty shy, spotting me from over a dozen meters away, and flitting off. I had to zoom in with my magical Canon SX-710 from almost 20 meters to capture these photos.

We are all three so happy with how pretty our garden looks. It is wonderful to share it with this swallowtail, and for him to grace our garden with his beauty.

After reading a bit about their life cycle, I will be letting local milkweed and other beneficials grow a little more freely.

I was going to post interesting bits about the Monarch Butterfly, its amazing 4-stage, 4-generation annual life-cycle from Mexico and nearby SW USofA. However, closer inspection led me to conclude my recent, regular garden visitor is instead a Two-Tailed Swallowtail butterfly. Probably every bit as cool and interesting, but just a tad different.

 

Two-tailed Swallowtail (Papilio multicaudata)

This large yellow and black striped butterfly is truly a gift from nature. It has two tails and beautiful blue markings scaling across the hind wings. This butterfly is lovely and graceful, yet it is so rarely enjoyed up close and personal. In 2001, the Two-tailed Swallowtail made its way into history; it officially became the State Butterfly of Arizona. If you live in the western part of the United States, this butterfly would be a wonderful addition to any garden.

Family: Swallowtail (Papilionidae)

Subfamily: Swallowtail (Papilioninae)

Average Wingspan: 3 1/2″ – 5″

Habitat: Foothill slopes and canyons, moist valleys

Similar To: Eastern Tiger Swallowtail , Western Tiger Swallowtail

Plants That Attract This Butterfly

* May not be available for purchase at your local nursery.

Note: Always check a plant’s Hardiness Zone to make sure it will grow in your area. (What Is My Hardiness Zone?)

Where To Buy Plants

Butterfly Flight Range Map

Two-tailed Swallowtail Flight Range Map

post card from Conner

Warm spring-like, rainy and sunny weather had made all but the drifts of snow disappear.

Overnight last night that changed in a big way with about 4 inches of fresh, light, fluffy powder.

Picture perfect opportunity not to be missed.

Hey, what is all this stuff?

Conner Cabin front yard

(note bird in upper left)

The Bitterroot Dwarf Penguin
(American Dipper to some)

Conner Cabin back side

Conner riverside trailhead

The Honeymoon Cabin


take a hike

Lest I be accused of failing to stop and smell the roses…. We live in a lovely vacation paradise, so it is easy to just STAY here and enjoy the nature in our own back yard. But we took a break that I share here with you.

Bear Creek

bear grass

bear grass +

Missy n Scooter on trail

paintbrush

paintbrushes

paint brushes

wildflowers 1

post card from Conner

It is a different world when the snow keeps on coming and we don’t have to go anywhere. We can just relax, smile and enjoy our snug little cabin. Better still, the storm is expected to be past by the time we do have places to go and people to see.

We are seeing snow like our winter on the other side of the mountains in Grangeville. Certainly no shortage of moisture in our mountains this year.

snowy-sunday